“To elected officials I say this: Don’t lie to us. Don’t make any more false promises, because when you do, children die,” 17-year-old high school senior David Hogg.


The Armory Center for the Arts seeks an innovative, collaborative and visionary leader to serve as its next Executive Director: http://bit.ly/2C7E3dU

Space, the final frontier. SpaceX is hiring a Manager Architectural Services and a Leadership Development Specialist: http://www.spacex.com/careers/list

Cal State Dominguez Hills is hiring a Tenure Track, Assistant Professor and Director University Gallery position in the Arts and Design: bit.ly/2CjSVRW

The American Museum of Ceramic Art is hiring an education and programs manager in Pomona: artsforla.org/job_listings

Promote critical consideration of art and design for social change and rigorous engagement. Art Center is hiring an Executive Director Designmatters: http://bit.ly/2ocsjxu

The Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara is hiring a strategic and visionary Executive Director: bit.ly/2Ent29R

Firefighters First Credit Union is hiring an Executive Director Fire Family Foundation: http://bit.ly/2o7yF1G

Help craft the LA County sustainability plan. UCLA is hiring an LA County Sustainability Law and Policy Fellow: http://bit.ly/2EzkKrl

Volunteers of America of Greater Los Angeles is hiring a Programs Manager: http://indeedhi.re/2oaY7Tc

Go Bruins! UCLA is hiring an Assistant Director, State Government Relations: http://bit.ly/2Fb4z4O

OTIS College of Art and Design is hiring a Director of Alumni Relations: http://bit.ly/2C54lgT

The California Community Foundation is hiring an Executive Assistant/ Program Associate reporting to the vice president of education and immigration: http://bit.ly/2Gj8bkD 

Boys and Girls Club of Santa Monica is hiring a College and Career Director: http://indeedhi.re/2BBvMxY

The Hilton Foundation is hiring an Administrative Assistant, Humanitarian Prize: http://bit.ly/2EyDzLB

The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority is hiring a Manager, Creative Services (Art Program). Salary $90-$136K. http://bit.ly/2HqsCgY

Develop groundbreaking exhibitions that explore our world through photography. The Annenberg Space for Photography is hiring a Director: http://bit.ly/2F7pFkt

The Pfaffinger Foundation is hiring an Executive Director: http://bit.ly/2o74s2O

Unicef is offering a 2-year Global Citizenship Fellowship, Community Engagement Fellow: http://bit.ly/2o5pVsV

Develop affordable housing solutions. Skid Row Housing Trust is hiring a CEO and a Senior Project Manager: http://skidrow.org/get-involved/jobs/

LAANE seeks a bilingual Communications Specialist for their campaigns to stand with working women and bring more recycling to residents in the region:  http://www.la2050.org/jobs/1215

The USC Program for Environmental and Regional Equity (PERE) and the Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration (CSII) are hiring a Project Manager: http://bit.ly/2EKQWvh


If you have a passion for making a difference in the lives of people around the world, Visa is hiring a Director, Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability in Foster City: bit.ly/2Es9nFV

Inspire creative exploration and expression through welcoming, hands-on arts education and experiences, The Crucible is hiring an Executive Director in Oakland: http://bit.ly/2EKHisx

The Kenneth Rainin Foundation is hiring a Chief Program Officer: http://bit.ly/2BBcl8s

The Silicon Valley Community Foundation is hiring a Director of Corporate Responsibility: http://bit.ly/2HmLVrv


Dia Art Foundation is hiring a Director of Communications: http://bit.ly/2C4lzL8

MOMA is hiring an Assistant Curator of Drawings and Prints: http://bit.ly/1TQIoSz

The Katonah Museum of Art is hiring a Director in NY: http://www.katonahmuseum.org/ 

The Royal Ontario Museum is hiring a Chief Digital Officer. http://bit.ly/2EBy6Yo

Burro Tools for a Better Life, Product Design Fellowship, Ghana. http://bit.ly/2EB7xTi


The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is hiring a Design and Facilitation of Youth Leadership Programme Consultant: http://indeedhi.re/2BzONAL


Preserving the American Dream

Last week I spoke to my Dad on the phone just as he was heading off to an event at UC Riverside featuring author, political scientist and Harvard professor Robert Putnam. Putnam was in town to discuss his latest book, “Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis.” As we were finishing up our conversation, I blurted out “Why don’t you write a blog post about the event?” My Dad has never written a blog post, so I am delighted and thrilled that he decided to give it a try and I am honored to be the one to publish it.

By Les Whitaker (Guest Blogger & my Dad)

In a recent New York Times opinion column, Ashley Parker discussed the recent outbreak of violence at Trump campaign rallies. She concludes that both supporters of Mr. Trump and protesters “say they feel deeply wronged and disenfranchised, albeit in different ways.” Both sides are obviously angry.

The Trump supporters explained to her “how their vision for the country — a place where if you worked hard and followed the rules, you could provide for you family and have a decent life — is being snatched from them.”

Ironically, the protesters have the same vision. Many are minorities, including Blacks, Hispanics and Muslims. They too believe in the American dream, “believing that if they worked hard and followed the rules, they could melt into this nation that has welcomed so many.”

Thus, both sides are angry because they see the American dream of upward mobility slipping away from them.

In his new book, “Our Kids, The American Dream in Crisis”, Harvard political scientist Robert Putnam, “examines America’s growing inequality gap, why fewer Americans today have the opportunity for upward mobility, and what communities, parents, families and schools can do about it.”

In particular, Mr. Palmer focuses on equality of opportunity and social mobility as the essential components of the American dream. This basic principle has been compromised in the last several decades by startling increases in income inequality and a consequential segregation of Americans along economic class lines. The result has been de facto neighborhood and educational segregation along economic class lines.

Palmer addresses the factors that have created this crisis in families, parenting, schooling and communities by presenting stories of actual young adults in various situations.

In the concluding chapter, he finds in all these stories, and accompanying factual data, “the steady deterioration of the economic circumstances of lower-class families, especially compared to the expanding resources available to upper-class parents.” In other words, there is a link between income inequality and opportunity inequality which threatens the possibility of upward mobility which is at the heart of the American dream.

Mr. Palmer posits that unequal opportunity also inflicts an economic cost on the country as a whole and, more importantly threatens the essence of democracy (equal influence on public decisions) itself. He argues that ignoring disadvantaged children violates our deepest religious and moral values. He concludes that “the growing opportunity gap between rich and poor kids in America today is morally unacceptable.”

Mr. Palmer then presents a number of positive suggestions for actions that will potentially lessen the opportunity gap. These include tax and other policies that may strengthen the family, especially single parent families. Other suggestions relate to child development and early childhood education.   With regard to schools, he suggests a number of possible measures that could lessen the opportunity gap, such as eliminating the effects of social class housing segregation by moving kids, money and/or teachers to different schools. Many other possibilities are presented for schools and communities.

All of these suggestions are based on the underlying principle that we each have a responsibility to everyone’s kids, “[f]or America’s poor kids do belong to us and we to them. They are our kids.”

Thus, the angry Trump supporters and the angry protesters have failed to examine the reasons why they are angry. If they did so, they would find that each group perceives, correctly, that the American dream is in crisis. Instead of being angry and violent at political rallies, they should examine the reasons for the crisis, as set forth by Mr. Palmer, and consider how they can become part of the solution instead of being part of the problem.